Dog Greetings: “Hello!” Or “Oh No!”

Throughout our daily interactions, humans greet other humans in a variety of settings. We meet at the grocery store, the gym or a walk around the block. During these interactions, humans face each other and engage direct eye contact to whom they are communicating. If eye contact is avoided, the communicator can be perceived as aloof, rude or mischievous. If the eye contact is direct and uninterrupted, the communicator may seem angry or hurtful. Dogs on the other hand are not keen on direct eye contact and prefer small doses of face-to-face interaction. Learning to communicate with dogs can be as difficult, if not more so, than learning another human language. Keep reading for information on how to lessen the burden of learning to speak “dog”. More

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Name…Command…Action!

Humans are a species that utilize language to convey wants or needs.  It’s a basic enough concept; but it’s becomes more complicated when communicating with another species. From a young age, humans learn or develop language to properly communicate to others within their species. It’s quite impressive how humans can use a variety of words for one thing and other humans are capable of interpreting the correct meaning. Dogs too can interpret human messages but sometimes the language is too complicated or overused. Below are simple guidelines to eliminate common errors between dog-human communication. More

Play Time

Humans and dogs are connected on many levels, namely we both love to play. Dogs are always at the ready for a game of fetch, tug or chase. Humans too are readily involved in play environments, be it actively or passively (how many readers watch game shows and competitive sports on television?). This similarity helps our two species get along so well and find the other so riveting.

 Human/Dog Connection

Scientists have noted that humans tend to exhibit paedomorphic tendencies. This means that humans tend to be juvenile versions of their adult ancestors. This adolescent behavior accounts for approximately one third of humans’ lives. Human infancy is extended compared to their nearest ape ancestor. Dogs exhibit this same characteristic in regard to wolf infancy. More

Leader of the Pack

Lately, I have been seeing people tying their dogs out on a long leash in the yard. While they run around chasing the passersby, the humans consider this activity the dog’s daily exercise. 

Animals are pack creatures which involves a migratory instinct. By lazily attaching the clasp and returning to watch reruns of “The Bachelor” you are unconsciously creating a monster. 

Pack Instinct 101

Dogs are creatures that follow in line to the chain of command. With domestication, YOU become the top dog! When you say jump, your dog should have all four off the floor. Not giving your dog the indication that you are the one who calls the shots can lead to a variety of undesirable behaviors: More

A little lovin’

All beings deserve to love and to feel loved. Unfortunately, we can’t really know whether our dog friends love us but it sure can seem like it! Dogs are not the biggest fans of hugs (it’s a sign of dominance) so here are ways to show your dog some loving:

Five Minute Fetch

My dog always greets me with his “buddy” or ball in his mouth. He is naturally inclined for this (he’s a working breed) but also, sometimes he just wants to play! Fetch is a pretty simple game if you have five minutes to spare or are able to multitask with your toothbrush and a tennis ball.  More